The Resource Threat posed by mounting vigilantism in Mexico, George W. Grayson, (electronic resource)

Threat posed by mounting vigilantism in Mexico, George W. Grayson, (electronic resource)

Label
Threat posed by mounting vigilantism in Mexico
Title
Threat posed by mounting vigilantism in Mexico
Statement of responsibility
George W. Grayson
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Until the 1980s, Mexico enjoyed relative freedom from violence. Ruthless drug cartels existed, but they usually abided by informal rules of conduct hammered out between several capos and representatives of the dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which ruled the country until the 1990s. Relying on bribes, the desperados pursued their illicit activities with the connivance of authorities. In return for the legal authorities turning a blind eye, drug dealers behaved discretely, shunned high-tech weapons, deferred to public figures, spurned kidnapping, and even appeared with governors at their children's weddings. Unlike their Colombian counterparts, Mexico's barons did not seek elective office. In addition, they did not sell drugs within the country, corrupt children, target innocent people, engage in kidnapping, or invade the turf or product-line (marijuana, heroin, cocaine, etc.) of competitors. The situation was sufficiently fluid so that should a local police or military unit refused to cooperate with a cartel, the latter would simply transfer its operations to a nearby municipality where they could clinch the desired arrangement. Three key events in the 1980s and 1990s changed the "live and let live" ethos that enveloped illegal activities. Mexico became the new avenue for Andean cocaine shipped to the United States after the U.S. military and law-enforcement authorities sharply reduced its flow into Florida and other South Atlantic states. The North American Free Trade Agreement, which took effect on January 1, 1994, greatly increased economic activities throughout the continent. Dealers often hid cocaine and other drugs among the merchandise that moved northward through Nuevo Laredo, El Paso, Tijuana, and other portals. The change in routes gave rise to Croesus-like profits for cocaine traffickers -- a phenomenon that coincided with an upsurge of electoral victories. Largely unexamined amid this narco-mayhem are vigilante activities. With federal resources aimed at drug traffickers and local police more often a part of the problem than a part of the solution, vigilantes are stepping into the void. Suspected criminals who run afoul of these vigilantes endure the brunt of a skewed version of justice that enjoys a groundswell of support
Cataloging source
AWC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1938-2015
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Grayson, George W.
Government publication
federal national government publication
Index
no index present
LC call number
U413.A66
LC item number
G732 2011
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Army War College (U.S.)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Vigilantes
  • Social movements
  • Culture conflict
  • Drug traffic
  • Narco-terrorism
  • Drug control
  • Cartels
  • National security
  • Vigilance committees
  • Crime
Label
Threat posed by mounting vigilantism in Mexico, George W. Grayson, (electronic resource)
Link
http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo12764
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Title from PDF title page (viewed on September 15, 2011)
  • "September 2011."
  • "External Research Associate Program."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 46-51)
Color
black and white
Contents
Introduction -- Overview of the violence sweeping Mexico -- Changing the rules of the game -- Inability of citizens to influence elected officials -- Vigilante eruptions -- Trends in vigilantism -- Organized vigilante groups -- Addressing "community justice"
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 59 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781584874980
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn752543989
Label
Threat posed by mounting vigilantism in Mexico, George W. Grayson, (electronic resource)
Link
http://purl.fdlp.gov/GPO/gpo12764
Publication
Note
  • Title from PDF title page (viewed on September 15, 2011)
  • "September 2011."
  • "External Research Associate Program."
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 46-51)
Color
black and white
Contents
Introduction -- Overview of the violence sweeping Mexico -- Changing the rules of the game -- Inability of citizens to influence elected officials -- Vigilante eruptions -- Trends in vigilantism -- Organized vigilante groups -- Addressing "community justice"
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 59 p.)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781584874980
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)ocn752543989

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